And then there were fandoms

Oct 20

[video]

aonootaku:

spookycactusjunie:

[kicks your door in]

YOU ARE DOING YOUR BEST WITH THE CIRCUMSTANCES GIVEN TO YOU AND IF ANYONE TELLS YOU DIFFERENT THEY ARE WRONG YOU ARE DOING GREAT AND I LOVE YOU AND I’M VERY PROUD OF YOU AND I BROUGHT YOU YOUR FAVORITE FOOD [aggressively slams down food container on the table]

Don’t make me cry I’ve been doing fine all day and then you make me feel like I’m worth it and ugh gosh darnit

(Source: skeletonqueenliu, via downtime-dimension)

[video]

memeaboos:

pls stop forgetting about demisexuals thank u

(via pansexual-and-proud)

carryonmy-assbutt:

muppidupp:

nayx:

Why am I awake who summoned me

image

that is so adorable 

(via pansexual-and-proud)

smitethepatriarchy:

holymashedpotatoesbatman:

klinki:

self diagnosing is so hard because everytime you’re like “maybe I am mentally ill” theres also a big part of you going “nah you’re probably just a naturally lazy/nasty/disgusting/useless person trying to find an excuse for your behavior” because of the institutionalized ableism that runs through everything

So go to the doctor and get an actual diagnosis?

Why don’t poor people just buy more money?

(Source: klinkingchains, via pansexual-and-proud)

Things I need to remember.

Things I need to remember.

Oct 19

mochakimono:

[Bi version]
[Queer version] [Gay version]
[Ace version] [Demi version]

mochakimono:

[Bi version]

[Queer version] [Gay version]

[Ace version] [Demi version]

(via pansexualfacts)

mitunapasta:

MONOGAMY IS NOT THE ONLY WAY OF BEING FAITHFUL AND TRUSTWORTHY

DO NOT EQUATE MONOGAMY AND FAITHFULNESS DO NOT DO IT POLYAMOROUS PEOPLE CAN BE FAITHFUL TOO 

SAY IT WITH ME

POLYAMOROUS PEOPLE CAN BE FAITHFUL TOO

(via pansexual-and-proud)

depressioncomix:

from the archive: depression comix #46

depressioncomix:

from the archive: depression comix #46

autisticadvocacy:

joyeuse-noelle:

sanityscraps:

Fun fact about American health care: if I ever need an organ transplant, I’ll somehow have to hide my autism, depression, and anxiety from the doctors, or else I’ll be disqualified under ideas about quality of life. It’s really great to know how valued disabled and neurodivergent lives are.

So here’s a thing many people don’t know about me: I used to be a medical data analyst. (I still do it occasionally, but not as a full-time job.) It’s a pretty self-explanatory job: I took data - often in enormous datasets - and analyzed it to find patterns. (Obviously, we couldn’t associate these with individual patients; this was just after HIPAA had come into effect, and so this data was very heavily scrubbed to remove any identifiable information.)

One of the patterns I looked for was quality of life and quality of care for people with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI). For our purposes, that meant major depression, bipolar disorder, general anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, and “other SPMI” (I encourage you to not send me messages telling me how those categories are terrible, because a) it was ten years ago and b) I wasn’t in charge of the categories.) In particular, we looked at injury, illness, and death in people with SPMI, compared with the general population, while they were in the hospital and at certain intervals after they were released (30 days, 60 days, 90 days, 180 days, and 1 year).

People with severe and persistent illness were much more likely to become ill and/or die in the hospital or shortly after discharge than the “general population”. People with schizophrenia had nearly ten times the deaths while in the hospital, and twelve times the injuries and illnesses.

Just as telling were the notes associated with the patient records. There was a significant pattern in the terminology used. In patients in the “general population”, doctors tended to use the word “is”: for example, “patient is suffering from abdominal cramping”. In patients with SPMI, doctors tended to use the phrase “claims to be”: for example, “patient claims to be suffering from abdominal cramping”.

It was clear to us that medical professionals - in general, I know for a fact that there are doctors out there who don’t do this - were assuming that patients with severe and persistent mental illness were inventing some, if not all, of their symptoms - that the symptoms were not real, and therefore did not need to be treated.

And because of that, these patients were falling ill and dying at alarming rates.

This isn’t personal anecdotes. I spent more than a year analyzing this data - which came from actual hospitals in the United States - and finding these patterns. There’s a problem here.

(I would prefer not to give out the name I was using then in public here, but if you’re interested, message me privately and I’ll see if I can get you links to the articles.)

I* believe there is similar data on Developmental Disabilities. In policy discussions it is not uncommon to hear health issues, both mental and physical, attributed to the DD without investigating if it were accurate or not.

*mod Savannah

(via solongtodevotion)

HOW DO I LET PEOPLE KNOW THAT I AM INTERESTED IN KISSING THEM

(Source: eggtragedy, via pansexual-and-proud)

[video]

[video]